Tag Archives: Emily Dickinson

Emily Dickinson’s Summer Reveries

(c) Copyright 2017 Margaret Langstaff, All Rights Reserved Summer, The Dickinson Homestead, Amherst, Mass. Emily Dickinson, one of America’s most beloved and misunderstood poets was an astute observer and student of the natural world.  Nature’s changing pageantry, big bold and … Continue reading

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Of Poets and Poetasters: National Poetry Month

So what’s a poetaster? Most people are pretty sure they know what a poet is, but poetaster, first used by Ben Jonson in 1600, has fallen into disuse. Well, fact is, though we throw the word poet around with flippant … Continue reading

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“Beauty crowds me till I die.” Emily Dickinson

Here are some of my favorite lines from my favorite poets–just to share and for the heck of it.  Poetry (the really good stuff) has always been my favorite genre as both a reader and writer. The above line is … Continue reading

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“Hope Is the Thing with Feathers”

The following famous Emily Dickinson poem is apropos for any author concluding the arduous process of writing a book (as in your truly). A certain amount of apprehension always attends these times, apprehension in particular that the book will find … Continue reading

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In like a Lion, Out like a Lamb

Readers of this blog will know I’m a life long Emily Dickinson fanatic and have studied and written about her for years. In this messy business we call early spring, it seems I never fail to recollect her many poems … Continue reading

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This Emily Dickinson poem is for our friends in the Northeast tonight– we hope they are warm!

It sifts from leaden sieves — It powders all the Wood. It fills with Alabaster Wool The Wrinkles of the Road — It makes an Even Face Of Mountain, and of Plain — Unbroken Forehead from the East Unto the … Continue reading

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The Soul Selects Her Own Society – Emily Dickinson

(c) 2014 Margaret Langstaff, All Rights Reserved I recently had the rare and arduous experience of re-reading for the umpteenth time all of Emily Dickinson‘s 1,775 surviving “poems”–but this time straight through over a period of two weeks. I’m working … Continue reading

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“The way hope builds his house” — Emily Dickinson (Manuscript)

Originally posted on Biblioklept:
Poet Emily Dickinson E.D. had difficult handwriting and wrote on anything handy. She did not leave polished manuscripts of her poems for publication in most cases.  This was eventually published as poem #1481 and dated c. 1879   “The way Hope … Continue reading

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A Hortatory HEADACHE

Any honest assiduous reader must confess that looking too closely and too long at the object (s) of one’s desire can altogether cancel any beneficiary effect. [Please see previous post]. Tonight I wanted to give Thoreau and his self-righteous certitude … Continue reading

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“Some Place” (is better than no place at all)

In the rural South, if you are a newbie in town, or just passing through, and pull into a truck stop or Mini-Mart, for however brief a time and however chintzy a purchase, you are sure to be asked a … Continue reading

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A Certain Slant of Light, Winter Afternoons

Winter has its charms and compensations, yes, and a terrible abbreviated monochromatic beauty, but it’s also a challenge for certain light sensitive, shivery types, requiring ever-increasing degrees of resolve as they march deeper into December, dreading January and that thing … Continue reading

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Split the Lark–and You’ll Find the Music?

           A recent online exchange with a fellow blogger about the inexpressible and inexplicable nature of really great books brought to mind the following poem by Emily Dickinson. I thought I’d share it with you for it captures so concisely and … Continue reading

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New Online Emily Dickinson Archive

This reclusive, intensely shy and private poet, virtually ignored by the literati during her 19th century  lifetime, has acquired a staying power and an exponentially growing reputation today that would have shocked the socks off the people who knew her … Continue reading

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DON’T TRIP ON THE TROPES: “There Came a Day at Summer’s Full Entirely for Me”

(c) Copyright 2013, Margaret Langstaff, All Rights Reserved. Here is another beautiful example of Emily Dickinson‘s “sacramental” relationship with the natural world (cf., my previous posts).         THERE came a day at summer’s full Entirely for me; I … Continue reading

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Emily Dickinson’s Encounters with the Sublime

© Copyright 2013, Margaret Langstaff, All Rights Reserved.                                          Nature and God – I neither knew                    Yet Both so well knew me                    They startled, like Executors                    Of My identity.—E.D. I’ve read, studied and written about … Continue reading

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A Bird Came Down the Walk

For some reason my Dickinsonia instincts and my deep appreciation of her poetry kick in full blast in the summer and winter (“There’s a certain slant of light/On winter afternoons/That oppresses like the heft/Of cathedral tunes” etc). But today I observed … Continue reading

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The Sound of One Leg Rapping

Cricket song in the summer, particularly at night, is one of the wonders and pleasures of the season.  Their sweet tinny chorus rises and falls resonantly,  is the soundtrack for a host of happy outdoor activities this time of year, and … Continue reading

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Some Telling Truths about Truth Itself by Authors Who Were or Are Intent on Telling the Truth

This is a thorny issue, and dangerous under the best of circumstances. But it is an inescapable one, an ongoing lifelong challenge, for serious writers.  So many acceptable dodges, evasions, even escapes, are handily available, and it’s far easier to … Continue reading

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This Quiet Dust

      (c) Copyright 2013 Margaret Langstaff, All Rights Reserved [What follows is a rambling, ruminative follow-up to a book review I recently posted on Goodreads. Books that address ultimate questions often have such a residual effect on readers. I beg … Continue reading

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A Valentine for Emily Dickinson

(c) Copyright 2013, Margaret Langstaff, All Rights Reserved. WARNING, STUDENTS: DO NOT COPY & PASTE We’ll get ya, count on it! For all the critical and popular acclaim she receives today, the poet Emily Dickinson (1830-1886) passed her life in … Continue reading

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